10 September 2013

Common GlassFish Problems

This article will give a short overview of the common GlassFish problems. Read it to learn how you can eradicate middleware problems and get GlassFish support from our Middleware Expert Support team.


GlassFish is a popular open source application server originally developed by Sun Microsystems and continued by Oracle. It’s developed alongside the latest releases of the Java EE specification so that major versions of GlassFish correspond to major versions of the Java EE specification.
C2B2 have worked with GlassFish for many years now and, in that time, have seen a wide range of issues when it comes to GlassFish. Here are a few of the things we do most often:

Performance Tuning

One of the worst things to hear from either your customers or management: “the website is slow”. Even if the website goes down, you may be able to resume a functioning website while you investigate the root cause, but performance is often more difficult to diagnose and you likely won’t be able to resume the same level of functionality because of the wide range of potential causes. How do you follow the principles of performance tuning when you need answers fast?


Oracle GlassFish, the non-free edition of GlassFish, has a tool called the Performance Tuner to help you – the problem is you won’t find this tool in the open source edition! It’s a great little tool to help you get the most out of GlassFish when you don’t know your Xmx from your Xms, but what if you don’t have that luxury?
For many people, the appeal of GlassFish is the fact that it is open source and therefore free – so what about all those users for whom performance tuning is a dark art?
C2B2 Expert Support can provide advice on tuning any size of GlassFish environment, whether small or large. Since C2B2 has made its name in customer engagements where non-functional requirements like performance are critical issues, our advice comes with the weight of years of tried-and-tested solutions provided to many other customers.

Monitoring

The importance of monitoring production environments hardly needs stressing to most; it’s quite plain to see that maintaining a healthy infrastructure is made far easier when data, and alerts based on that data, are available.
Despite all that, it’s rare to see users making full use of all the data that’s available. Operating system level monitoring can give you an indication of the health of the host, but not the middleware that’s running on it.
Enabling the monitoring that is available with GlassFish is one way of getting some insight but, if done poorly or without care, can incur performance cost.

For more technical details on GlassFish monitoring and performance tuning, see our recent blog post.

Maybe you’ve experienced some of the pain of the scenarios we’ve outlined, or maybe you’re seeing entirely different problems! C2B2 Expert Support is more than just a helpdesk. Our customers’ problems become our problems and we make every effort to work with you to get the best out of the software you’ve paid for.



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2 comments :

  1. Are there similar options for monitoring Tomcat servers like there are for Weblogic?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Charro, there are certainly options for both. Hyperic has a WebLogic plugin which works with WebLogic upto 10.3.* (11g) and also has a Tomcat plugin. RHQ has a plugin which will work with Tomcat too, but none for WebLogic.

      Both Tomcat and WebLogic can be monitored over JMX so, in theory, any JMX capable monitoring tool will work with either. You should bear in mind, though, that generic JMX monitoring won't necessarily capture all the available data. WebLogic, for instance, has a lot of platform-specific MBeans some of which Hyperic's plugin will capture, but a generic plugin will have no knowledge of.

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